breaking boxes one at a time

Sep 28

[video]

mothernaturenetwork:

The largest bird to fly, Argentavis magnificens, was believed to have flown like a high-performance glider and lived 6 million years ago in Argentina. It was close to the size of a Cessna 152 airplane. The board soared on the winds like a glider and could reach speeds of up to 150 mph. Experts are still not sure how it achieved landing and takeoff.10 of the biggest animals to roam the planet

mothernaturenetwork:

The largest bird to fly, Argentavis magnificens, was believed to have flown like a high-performance glider and lived 6 million years ago in Argentina. It was close to the size of a Cessna 152 airplane. The board soared on the winds like a glider and could reach speeds of up to 150 mph. Experts are still not sure how it achieved landing and takeoff.
10 of the biggest animals to roam the planet

(Source: pinkmanjesse, via zindelo)

(Source: restartliving, via zindelo)

[video]

deepseathoughts:

shout out to Au in the upper right
& rainbow tourmaline in the bottom right

deepseathoughts:

shout out to Au in the upper right

& rainbow tourmaline in the bottom right

(Source: pootee)

earth-song:

Midori, a juvenile green tree python (Morelia viridis), on our weeping cherry tree.

earth-song:

Midori, a juvenile green tree python (Morelia viridis), on our weeping cherry tree.

(via orchid-ink)

earthfix:

Halfway, Oregon—August 26, 2012— Anchored to a steep slope in a bed of limestone 8,000 feet up Cusick Mountain in Oregon’s Wallowa Mountains, this ancient limber pine could be the oldest living thing in Oregon. It’s impossible to say exactly how old because the heart of the tree is rotted away but the tree is still alive and continues to produce cones. Most of the tree is without its bark and weathered over centuries of exposure. Jamie Francis/The Oregonian

earthfix:

Halfway, Oregon—August 26, 2012— Anchored to a steep slope in a bed of limestone 8,000 feet up Cusick Mountain in Oregon’s Wallowa Mountains, this ancient limber pine could be the oldest living thing in Oregon. It’s impossible to say exactly how old because the heart of the tree is rotted away but the tree is still alive and continues to produce cones. Most of the tree is without its bark and weathered over centuries of exposure. Jamie Francis/The Oregonian

Prudent management and decision-making can help ensure that CSAs, an alternative method of food distribution, can continue to benefit both growers and subscribers. -

earthfix:

(Source: mysticalfeline, via orchid-ink)

Mar 09

(Source: daul, via metaconscious)

[video]

13neighbors:

Where am I? by Renaldy Fernando on Flickr.

13neighbors:

Where am I? by Renaldy Fernando on Flickr.

(via cervid-deactivated20120602)

[video]

yama-bato:

Andreas Feininger
via

yama-bato:

Andreas Feininger

via

(via indigenousdialogues)